English : asked on cmessick03
 10.02.2020

Read the excerpt from chapter 6 of lizzie bright and the buckminster boy.
lizzie looked at him for a long time, tilting her head to one side as if trying to figure him out—which was what she was doing. "you're a strange person, you know that, turner buckminster? i wonder if you can see anything straight. what do you think your daddy would say if he saw us two standing out here right now? or knew that i would be coming up to mrs. cobb's house just to hear you play? "
"he'd say h*ll and d*mnation. so you going to come? "
"i'll come. at high tide, when i can't be clamming anyway."
"then i'll see you tomorrow at high tide, lizzie bright."
"yes, you will," she said, and whistling softly, she turned toward the back of the yard. the sea breeze came down from the leaves and followed at her heels, jumping up now and again and frisking all around.
turner snuck back inside, as quiet as could be, thinking of high tide.
based on the excerpt, which lines support the conclusion that turner is willing to defy his father’s wishes and see lizzie the next day? check all that apply.
a) lizzie looked at him for a long time, tilting her head to one side as if trying to figure him out—which was what she was doing.
b) “what do you think your daddy would say if he saw us two standing out here right now? "
c) "he'd say h*ll and d*mnation. so you going to come? "
d) “then i'll see you tomorrow at high tide, lizzie bright."
e) turner snuck back inside, as quiet as could be, thinking of high tide.

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17.02.2022, solved by verified expert
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c) "He'd say h*ll and d*mnation. So you going to come?"

d) “Then I'll see you tomorrow at high tide, Lizzie Bright."

e) Turner snuck back inside, as quiet as could be, thinking of high tide.

Explanation:

The historical novel "Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy" was written by Gary D. Schmidt. The setting of this story is during the racial discrimination, with the protagonist Turner Buckminster befriending a black girl Lizzie.

The excerpt from Chapter 6 of the story shows Lizzie and Turner secretly meeting despite Turner's father's stand on his son being friends with a colored person. The brave and adamant act of defying his father's wishes is evident when he agrees to meet Lizzie the next day. The lines

"He'd say h*ll and d*mnation. So you going to come?"

“Then I'll see you tomorrow at high tide, Lizzie Bright."

Turner snuck back inside, as quiet as could be, thinking of high tide.

all show how he fully intend to meet Lizzie no matter what.

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English
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P Answered by Master
I am quite sure that she revealed her belief through her words. During the little dialogue scene where she runs on with what appears to be a conversation between her and Mrs Cobb, her words seem to give off a sense of discomfort. 

I may be wrong here, but hopefully, you can see why I'm leaning towards this possibility! =)
English
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P Answered by Specialist
I am quite sure that she revealed her belief through her words. During the little dialogue scene where she runs on with what appears to be a conversation between her and Mrs Cobb, her words seem to give off a sense of discomfort. 

I may be wrong here, but hopefully, you can see why I'm leaning towards this possibility! =)
English
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P Answered by PhD

Answer: B. the uncontrollable power of nature.

In this passage, we can see how powerful the colossal Moby-Dick is, and how frail and insignificant humans appear to be by comparison. When Ahab wants to fight with the whale, he is completely helpless and is easily defeated and injured. The power of the whale is a symbol that represents the incontrollable power of nature.

English
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P Answered by Specialist
Options:
A.) California is an excellent location for immigrants who are seeking land to farm.
B.) California has many immigrants who have grown a large supply of healthy crops.
C.) California is the best source for government loans for building railroads in the state.
D.) California has the most plentiful resources for people who want a healthy lifestyle.

Answer:
D.) California has the most plentiful resources for people who want a healthy lifestyle.

Explanation:
The poster named "CALIFORNIA the CORNUCOPIA of the WORLD ROOM for MILLIONS of IMMIGRANTS 43.795.000. ACRES of GOVERNMENT LANDS UNTAKEN RAILROAD & PRIVATE LAND FOR MILLIONS OF FARMERS!"

A poster’s job is to promote an idea, event, product or person. So here the poster of California promotes itself as a place full of resources that offers people staying there a healthy and peaceful lifestyle. It is a way of advertising and to spread the message. California is generally a good place to stay in. It is the best place for immigrants who seek to find a living for themselves. That’s what the poster would help to do, attract more immigrants to the place.
Options:
A.) California is an excellent location for immigrants who are seeking land to farm.
B.)
English
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P Answered by PhD

The correct answer is: simile

Through this text, we can see that the phrase "It is as if a great earthen pot has dropped from an unreachable rafter'' represents a comparison with the doubts that the narrator presents. This comparison is made through two elements that have nothing in common, but that the author uses to create a new meaning about one of them. This is done through simile.

English
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P Answered by Specialist

Answer:

Answer explained in detail below.

Step-by-step explanation:

In the passage "Boston Navy Yard and the 'Great War,' 1914-1918," the author presents a detailed account of the history of the Boston Navy Yard, specifically focusing on its transformation during World War I. The author develops the significance of this transformation by providing historical context, describing specific events and changes at the Navy Yard, and highlighting the impact of the Yard's actions on the war effort.

The author begins by providing historical context for the Boston Navy Yard, describing its establishment in 1801 and its role as a major naval shipyard for the United States. This sets the stage for the significance of the Yard's transformation during World War I, as it was a key player in the war effort.

The author then describes specific events and changes that occurred at the Navy Yard during the war. For example, the author notes that the Yard's workforce grew from 2,500 workers to over 20,000, and that the Yard's production of ships and submarines increased dramatically. The author also describes how the Yard adapted to the changing needs of the war, such as by building subchasers and convoy escort ships.

The author also highlights the impact of the Yard's actions on the war effort. For example, the author states that the Yard's production of destroyers and submarines helped to tip the balance of the war in favor of the Allies. The author also notes that the Yard's actions played a significant role in the success of the convoy system, which helped to protect supplies and troops being transported across the Atlantic.

Overall, the author develops the significance of the Boston Navy Yard's transformation during World War I by providing historical context, describing specific events and changes at the Navy Yard, and highlighting the impact of the Yard's actions on the war effort. This information provides a clear understanding of the importance of the Navy Yard in the war and its impact on the outcome of the war.

English
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P Answered by PhD

Answer:

In lines 578-579, Mrs. Keeney tells her husband why she wanted to sail with him: "I wanted to see
you the hero they make you out to be in Homeport." In what way does the voyage change the way she sees her husband? Cite evidence from the play in your answer.
Mrs. Keeney sees that her husband is a hard man who can be brutal toward his crew in pursuit of
his goal. In lines 650-653, she tells him, "You want to live up to your silly reputation even if you do
have to beat and starve men and drive me mad to do it."
At the end of the play, Captain Keeney breaks his promise to his wife, even though he says he loves
her. What is the motivation for his behavior, beyond simple economic opportunity?
Keeney's pride pushes him to put his goal of
getting the oil ahead of any feelings for his wife. He needs to get the oil to feel strong and to prove himself. At the same time, he denies that his wife is really going mad, saying, "I know you're foolin' me" (lines 892-893). He may feel justified in staying "jest a little while longer" at sea because he can't believe she is actually losing her mind and because she insisted on making the voyage in the first place.

Step-by-step explanation:

make necessary changes as required to make the points better

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